Narrative Medicine

Narrative Medicine

Rita Charon

415-gtNnjkL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

Narrative medicine has emerged in response to a commodified health care system that places corporate and bureaucratic concerns over the needs of the patient. Generated from a confluence of sources including humanities and medicine, primary care medicine, narratology, and the study of doctor-patient relationships, narrative medicine is medicine practiced with the competence to recognize, absorb, interpret, and be moved by the stories of illness. By placing events in temporal order, with beginnings, middles, and ends, and by establishing connections among things using metaphor and figural language, narrative medicine helps doctors to recognize patients and diseases, convey knowledge, accompany patients through the ordeals of illness–and according to Rita Charon, can ultimately lead to more humane, ethical, and effective health care.
Trained in medicine and in literary studies, Rita Charon is a pioneer of and authority on the emerging field of narrative medicine. In this important and long-awaited book she provides a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the conceptual principles underlying narrative medicine, as well as a practical guide for implementing narrative methods in health care. A true milestone in the field, it will interest general readers, and experts in medicine and humanities, and literary theory.

Narrative Ethics

Narrative Ethics

Edited by Jakob Lothe and Jeremy Hawthorn

narrative

While Plato recommended expelling poets from the ideal society, W. H. Auden famously declared that poetry makes nothing happen. The 19 contributions to the present book avoid such polarized views and, responding in different ways to the “ethical turn” in narrative theory, explore the varied ways in which narratives encourage readers to ponder matters of right and wrong. All work from the premise that the analysis of narrative ethics needs to be linked to a sensitivity to esthetic (narrative) form. The ethical issues are accordingly located on different levels. Some are clearly presented as thematic concerns within the text(s) considered, while others emerge through (or are generated by) the presentation of character and event by means of particular narrative techniques. The objects of analysis include such well-known or canonical texts as Biblical Old Testament stories, Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, Jonathan Littell’s The Kindly Ones, Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian and Matthew Lewis’s The Monk. Others concentrate on less-well-known texts written in languages other than English. There are also contributions that investigate theoretical issues in relation to a range of different examples.

Amsterdam/New York, NY, 2013, XIII, 313 pp.

Pb: 978-90-420-3728-1
€ 68 / US$ 95

 

The Return of the Omniscient Narrator

The Return of the Omniscient Narrator

Authorship and Authority in Twenty-First Century Fiction

Paul Dawson

Theory and Interpretation of Narrative

Nancy

“Although many writers, as well as critics and narratologists, are well aware of the contested nature and limitations of both omniscience as a phenomenon and omniscient modes of storytelling, Paul Dawson demonstrates not only that these modes, which were virtually abandoned by modernist fiction, returned in many novels in the twenty-first century, but also that they have served to reclaim the narrative and cultural authority of the authors in question and of the novel and literature at large.” —Ansgar Nunning, University of Giessen, Germany

The Return of the Omniscient Narrator: Authorship and Authority in Twenty-First Century Fiction by Paul Dawson argues that the omniscient narrator, long considered a relic of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century novel, has reemerged as an important feature of contemporary British and American literary fiction. It further argues that the development of contemporary omniscience can be situated in relation to ongoing anxieties about the novel’s decline of cultural authority in the age of digital media. In this context the book identifies and classifies new modes of omniscient narration that are neither nostalgic revivals nor parodic critiques of classic omniscience, but the result of experimentations with narrative voice in the wake of postmodern fiction.

To address this phenomenon, the book reformulates existing definitions of literary omniscience, shifting attention away from questions of narratorial knowledge and toward omniscient narration as a rhetorical performance of narrative authority that invokes and projects a historically specific figure of authorship. Through a study of fiction by authors such as Zadie Smith, Jonathan Franzen, Richard Powers, Martin Amis, Rick Moody, Edward P. Jones, and Nicola Barker, the book analyzes how the conventional narrative authority of omniscient narrators is parlayed into claims for the cultural authority of authors and of the novel itself.

In the course of its investigation, The Return of the Omniscient Narrator engages with major movements in narrative theory—rhetorical, cognitive, and feminist—to challenge and reconsider many key narratological categories, including Free Indirect Discourse, the relation between voice and focalization, and the narrative communication model. This challenge is framed by an argument for a discursive approach to narrative fiction that addresses the neglect of authorship in narrative theory.

Paul Dawson (website, academia.edu) is senior lecturer in the School of the Arts and Media at the University of New South Wales, Australia.

Dec 2013
Literary Criticism/General
278 pp. 6×9

cart

$74.95 cloth 978-0-8142-1233-2
Add cloth to shopping cart

$14.95 CD 978-0-8142-9334-8
Add CD to shopping cart

Shopping Cart Instructions
Review/Change Shopping Cart & Check-out

A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative

A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative

Edited by Jan Alber, Henrik Skov Nielsen, and Brian Richardson

Theory and Interpretation of Narrative

unnatural
 “A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative touches on all of the relevant research fields and all of the important theoretical texts. There are many fascinating debates within the contributions, and some traditional narratological concepts are revisited with rewarding results. This volume promises to be an important and provocative contribution to narrative theory.” —Alan Palmer, author of Social Minds in the Novel

A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative offers a collection of foundational essays introducing the reader to the full scope of unnatural narrative theory: its meaning, its goals, its extent, its paradoxes. This volume brings together a distinguished group of international critics, scholars, and historians of literature that includes several of the world’s leading narrative theorists. Together, they survey many basic areas of narrative studies from an unnatural perspective: story, time, space, voice, minds, narrative levels, realism, nonfiction, hyperfiction, and narrative poetry. Rarely have these fundamental concepts been subjected to such an original and thoroughgoing reconceptualization. Much of the book is directed toward an investigation of experimental and antirealist work. Each essay focuses on texts and episodes that narrative theory has tended to neglect, and each provides theoretical formulations that are commensurate with such exceptional works. A Poetics of Unnatural Narrative articulates and delineates the newest and most radical movement in narrative studies. This anthology will be of great interest to students and scholars of narrative studies and of the history and theory of modern fiction.

Jan Alber is associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Freiburg, Germany. Henrik Skov Nielsen is professor in the Department of Aesthetics and Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark. Brian Richardson is professor in the Department of English at the University of Maryland.

Jul 2013
Literary Criticism/General
234 pp. 6×9

$63.95 cloth 978-0-8142-1228-8
Add cloth to shopping cart

$14.95 CD 978-0-8142-9330-0
Add CD to shopping cart

Shopping Cart Instructions
Review/Change Shopping Cart & Check-out

Narrative Theory

A Choice 2012 Outstanding Academic Title

Narrative Theory

Core Concepts and Critical Debates

David Herman, James Phelan and Peter J. Rabinowitz, Brian Richardson, and Robyn Warhol

narrative_therory
“This aptly titled book is a wonderful resource for introducing students to four major approaches to the study of narrative and the major debates on the subject of narrative. . . . [T]he genius of this volume—and what sets it apart from the various competing introductions to narrative theory—is its structure. In the first section of this book, the authors introduce the readers to four approaches to the study of narrative: rhetorical (James Phelan and Peter Rabinowitz), feminist (Robyn Warhol), mind-oriented (Herman), and unnatural/anti-mimetic (Brian Richardson). In the second section, each author responds to the analyses in the previous section. As such, the book works as a conversation . . . This is the most dynamic introduction to narrative theory in print. It will work well for all academic readers and it is a must-have for any scholar working in narrative theory.” —Choice

“Narrative Theory: Core Concepts and Critical Debates is organized in a supple, intellectually meaningful, and reader-friendly way. There are several good books about narrative, but I know of no book like this one. It will certainly be of interest to students of narrative—across disciplines—and of narrative theory.” —Gerald Prince, professor of Romance languages, University of Pennsylvania

Narrative Theory: Core Concepts and Critical Debates addresses two frequently asked questions about narrative studies: “what is narrative theory?” and “how do different approaches to narrative relate to each other?” In engaging with these questions, the book demonstrates the diversity and vitality of the field and promotes a broader dialogue about its assumptions, methods, and purposes.

In Part One, the co-authors explore the scope and aims of narrative from four distinct perspectives: rhetorical (Phelan and Rabinowitz), feminist (Warhol), mind-oriented (Herman), and unnatural (Richardson). Using case studies (Huckleberry Finn, Persuasion, On Chesil Beach, and Midnight’s Children, respectively), the co-authors explain their different takes on the same core concepts: authors, narrators, narration; plot, time, and progression; space, setting, and perspective; character; reception and the reader; and narrative values. In Part Two, the co-authors respond to one another’s views. As they discuss the relation of the approaches to each other, they highlight significant current debates and map out key developments in the field.

Accessibly written, Narrative Theory can serve as the basis for a wide range of courses, even as its incisive presentation of four major approaches and its lively give-and-take about the powers and limitations of each make the book an indispensable resource for specialists.

David Herman, James Phelan, and Robyn Warhol are faculty members in the Department of English at The Ohio State University, Peter J. Rabinowitz in the Department of Comparative Literature at Hamilton College, and Brian Richardson in the Department of English at the University of Maryland

Apr 2012
Literary Criticism/General
280 pp. 6×9

cart

$34.95 paper 978-0-8142-5184-3
Add paper to shopping cart

$69.95 cloth 978-0-8142-1186-1
Add cloth to shopping cart

$14.95 CD 978-0-8142-9285-3
Add CD to shopping cart

Shopping Cart Instructions
Review/Change Shopping Cart & Check-out